ITDP in the News

New bus rapid transit system earns Dar es Salaam 2018 Sustainable Transit Award

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New bus rapid transit system earns Dar es Salaam 2018 Sustainable Transit Award
Citiscope (6/30/17): The winner of this year’s Sustainable Transport Award was announced today at a ceremony here during a conference called Mobilize. The award is given annually by the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy, a global non-profit advocacy organization and host of the conference. As the winning city, Dar es Salaam will also host world transportation experts for next year’s Mobilize conference. view article >

The Self Driving-Dilemma

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CityLab (5/4/17): That’s one message from a new report prepared by the University of California Davis’s Institute of Transportation Studies and the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), a nonprofit organization that develops bus rapid transit systems and promotes environmentally friendly urban planning. They’ve been crunching the numbers on how to avert warming the planet with carbon emissions while also reducing gridlock and increasing mobility. view article >

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Mexico City May Abolish Its Parking Minimums

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Streetsblog USA (4/12/17): Once you factor in space for ramps and access lanes, that means about 40 percent of the square footage in an office development must be devoted to parking, said Andrés Sañudo, a Mexico City-based consultant who’s been working with the non-profit Institute for Transportation and Development Policy to help the city reform its parking policy.  In a recent white paper produced at the city’s request, ITDP recommended eliminating minimum parking requirements and replacing them with maximums. view article >

 

Uber for bikes: how “dockless” cycles flooded China – and are heading overseas

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The Guardian (3/22/17): Meanwhile, urban planner Zhu Jinglu at the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy – which set up Guangzhou’s public bike share and runs its Bus Rapid Transit system – would be delighted if the anecdotal increase in cyclists led to better cycle infrastructure. Development consultant Li Shuling agrees, but is sceptical she will see changes any time soon. view article >

Parking in China Can Be a Long March

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WSJ (1/18/16): By contrast, China is “too lenient towards drivers,” said Liu Shaokun, a vice country director at The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, a New York-based nonprofit outfit.  China has encouraged government and private capital to build more parking spaces. The central government in 2015 required cities with a population of more than 500,000 to target a ratio of 1.3 parking spaces per car when planning residential and commercial developments. view article >

 

All aboard Volvo’s very, very long bus. Like, all of you

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Wired (12/1/16): The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy publishes a list of BRT standards, which include dedicated right-of-ways, special intersection treatments, platform-level boarding, and off-board fare collection. (The people who drafted these guidelines are real transit nerds, and things get much more complicated from there.) Not one American transit system meets the gold standard criteria. Simply put, there’s nowhere for these things to rocket unimpeded. view article >

The people who need good transit most have the least access to it

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Treehugger (10/12/16):The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) takes a shorter, and more international view with a look at the last kilometre problem, measuring the number of residents in cities that have to walk more than a kilometer to get to high quality rapid transit. It’s called PNT or People Near Rapid Transit. view article >

100 % des habitants proches des transports en commun à Paris… mais pas en banlieue

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Le Monde (10/11/16): La capitale française arrive en tête d’un classement réalisé par l’Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). Dans un rapport, publié mardi 11 octobre, cet organisme spécialisé dans les transports en commun a recensé dans 26 métropoles mondiales le nombre de personnes habitant à moins d’un kilomètre d’un réseau « efficace », c’est-à-dire rapide, fréquent, avec des arrêts rapprochés. view article >

Lots to lose: how cities around the world are eliminating car parks

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The Guardian (9/27/16): “As parking regulations were put into zoning codes, most of the downtowns in many cities were just completely decimated,” says Michael Kodransky, global research manager for the Institute of Transportation and Development Policy. “What the cities got, in effect, was great parking. But nobody goes to a city because it has great parking.” view article >

Curious about Bus Rapid Transit? Check out Cleveland

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Detroit Free Press/USA Today (6/19/16): The HealthLine, which Calabrese describes as a $200-million project, is credited with generating $6.3 billion in economic development, and the Greater Cleveland RTA says it returns  $114 for every dollar spent to create and launch it. The system is described as a “clear best practice” by the New York-based Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, which gave it a “silver” designation in its latest ratings of BRT systems around the world. view article >

Cleveland’s new bike-share system will have a twist — you don’t have to dock at a station

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Vox (USA) 5/25/16:  As a 2013 analysis by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy found, the success of bike share in a city usually depends on more fundamental factors, such as station density (successful bike shares tend to have 10 to 16 stations in every square kilometer), coverage area (at least 10 square kilometers), number of bikes (at least 10 to 30 bikes per 1,000 people in the coverage area is optimal), and quality of bikes (they, uh, should be nice)… view article >

Blocking Traffic

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The Economist (International) 5/7/16: To solve the problem, Mexico will need to spend more money more intelligently. Three-quarters of transport investment in urban Mexico goes into expanding and maintaining roads, according to the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy… view article >

After Worst Smog in 11 Years, Mexico City Braces for More

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U.S. News & World Report (International) 3/18/16: Bernardo Baranda, Latin America director for the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, said that officials ought to re-establish limits on car circulation and improve cooperation across the various jurisdictions that make up the Valley of Mexico. Longer-term, he called for more investment in public transportation as well as tolls on cars and creation of areas open only to foot and bicycle traffic. “The root problem is the growth of the vehicle fleet,” Baranda said…view article>

 

Slowly does it: Traffic in the Philippines’ Capital

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The Economist (International) 2/27/16: Belatedly, Manila is trying something sensible. In December the Philippines approved a “rapid bus” route in north-east Manila, with buses travelling along dedicated lanes. Similar systems have worked well in Brazil and China. Karl Fjellstrom of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, a New York outfit, says he looks for three things when assessing whether a city is suited for a rapid bus system: traffic congestion, demand and physical infrastructure (that is, wide roads). Manila scores highly on all three. view article >

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How Much Can Bicycling Help Fight Climate Change? A Lot, If Cities Try

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Streetsblog (USA) 11/18/15: A new study from the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy attempts to measure the potential of bikes and e-bikes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. ITDP’s conclusion, in short: Bicycling could help cut carbon emissions from urban transportation 11 percent. view article >

Cycling the City: ‘I have a dream that Jakarta should be like Copenhagen’

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The Guardian (International) 9/14/15: The ITDP has developed a bike-sharing plan for Jakarta which would provide 2,000 bicycles at more than 100 stations across the city. The organisation has estimated it would cost between £2.5m and £4m for the facilities, with private sector involvement likely…View Article >

Rio’s Olympic Inequality Problem, in Pictures

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CityLab (International/USA) 9/9/15: “The modernist city doesn’t have space for the poor,” says Clarisse Cunha Linke, Brazil Country Director of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). “Barra is the most emblematic or iconic example of a disaster, of a modernist city that is worse than Brasilia.” View Article >

Paving Way to Make Walking Safe in Chennai

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The Times of India (India) 7/1/15: Cities that are easier to traverse on foot are better places to live, studies show. Keeping in mind the city’s active walking community, Corporation of Chennai is planning to re-engineer the streets to make them easier to access and safer for pedestrians. View Article >

How Curitiba’s BRT stations sparked a transport revolution

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The Guardian (International) 5/26/15: The city’s system became the world’s first bus rapid transit (BRT) network. “Curitiba was the first to include the essential elements necessary for a BRT system to function effectively,” says Andrés Fingeret, director of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy in Buenos Aires. View Article >

A Day Without Cars

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The Hindu (India) 4/25/15: A joint initiative by the Institute of Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) and Chennai City Connect Foundation, NCM has launched a project — Cycle Sundays — which will attempt to free the roads of cars at least for a day every week so that cyclists can have a ride that is a little less hindered. And pedestrians, a walk that a little less risky. View Article >

If You’re Reading this in Jakarta, You’re Probably Stuck in Traffic

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Voice of America (International) 2/4/15: An analysis based on satellite navigation data, contributed by motorists in 78 cities around the world using TomTom GPS devices, puts the Indonesian capital just slightly ahead of Istanbul for total stop-and-starts. Mexico City, Surabaya, Indonesia and St. Petersburg, Russia are next in the long line. View Article >

7 Design Lessons from the World’s Most Gorgeous BRT Stations

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City Lab (US National) 1/23/15: The United States has a lot to learn about quality bus-rapid transit, and great station design is toward the top of that lesson plan. Take the Orange Line BRT in Los Angeles—one of America’s highest-rated BRT systems, earning a bronze rating from the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy. It’s not that Orange Line stations like the one below are unattractive for bus stops. It’s just that they still inspire comparisons with bus stops. View Article >

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Capital Bikeshare Needs More Stations – Just Smaller

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The Washington Post (US National) 12/5/14: The most successful bikeshare systems in the world have dense networks with stations every few blocks, according to bikeshare guru Jon Orcutt. He cites the Institute for Transportation & Development Policy’s (ITDP) bikeshare planning guide, which bluntly states “increasing station density will yield increased market penetration.” View Article >

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Why aren’t American Bike Share Systems Living Up to Their Potential?

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Streetsblog USA (US National) 11/24/14: As policy director at the New York City Department of Transportation from 2007 to June, 2014, Jon Orcutt shepherded the nation’s largest bike-share system through the earliest stages of planning, a wide-ranging public engagement process, and, last year, the rollout of hundreds of Citi Bike stations. That makes Orcutt, formerly of Transportation Alternatives and the Tri-State Transportation Campaign, a leading U.S. expert on bike-share. I asked him to elaborate in an interview. View Article >

Bikes are best way to get around in Mexico City, group says

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Fox News Latino (Latin America & International) 8/20/14: Thirty-five riders participated in Desafio Modal 2014, an event organized to show that bicycles are the best mode of transportation in Mexico City. Tuesday’s transportation challenge pitted bicycles, automobiles, public transportation, motorcycles and pedestrians against each other, with the competitors vying to get from the San Lazaro Legislative Palace to the World Trade Center in the shortest time possible. View Article >

Brazil’s Largest City to Eliminate Minimum Parking Requirements

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Cities Today (UK & International) 7/16/14: The city is set to become the first developing megacity to eliminate parking minimums that currently require developers to build a designated amount of parking to serve housing and commercial uses. The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP) has ironically noted developers were losing money, as their supply requirement often outstripped market demand. View Article >

Transit-oriented Development is the Key to Better Cities

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Treehugger (International) 4/29/14: For years, city builders have called for Transit Adjacent development, piling density on top of subway stations and at transit nodes. Now the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy has introduced a far more sophisticated concept of Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and a TOD standard to promote it. View Article >

Les transports au cœur des nouveaux quartiers

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Radio France International 4//12/14: Listen here >

Global Survey Maps Out Growing Trend of Transit-oriented Development on Six Continents

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Reuters 4/10/14: A global catalog of 50 urban developments on six continents maps out the growing trend of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD). The survey, compiled by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), using its TOD Standard evaluation tool, shows which projects connect people conveniently, affordably and safely to jobs, shopping, education and other opportunities that cities provide. View Article >

IPCC authors find transportation emissions on track to double by 2050

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ClimateWire/EE News 4/10/14: On the current trajectory, greenhouse gas emissions from cars, trains, ships and airplanes may become one of the greatest drivers of human-induced climate change, according to a draft of the forthcoming U.N. fifth assessment report on mitigation of climate change. View Article >

How Buenos Aires unclogged its most iconic street

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citiscope (USA) 3/5/14: Buses used to be stuck in the mix of traffic on 9 de Julio, jostling with with cars, taxis and trucks. Now, buses have their own lanes for 3 km before peeling off into traffic to get to their destinations. More than 200,000 commuters, many of them traveling to or from the suburbs, enjoy a faster ride that also makes a subway transfer obsolete. View article >

Buenos Aires honoured for sustainable transport improvements

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Blue & Green Tomorrow (UK) 2/12/14: Buenos Aires has won the 2014 Sustainable Transport Award, after improvements to the world’s widest avenue turned the Argentinean capital into “a city for people, not just for cars”. The city was handed the accolade by the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP). This is following a series of measures put in place by local authorities to improve transport efficiency in the city. View article >

Premian a la ciudad por el transporte sustentable

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La Nacion (Argentina), 1/15/14: La ciudad de Buenos Aires ganó ayer un premio internacional por sus proyectos de movilidad sustentable y se sumó así a la lista que ya integran Nueva York y San Francisco (Estados Unidos), Ahmedabad (India), Guangzhou (China), Medellín (Colombia) y México DF, que fueron galardonadas previamente. View article >

Bike Share, Ride Share, and the Cloud

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National Journal (USA) 12/9/13: Bike-share systems can be one of the most cost-effective mass transit modes available, according to ITDP. Washington D.C., for example, pays a private enterprise to run its Capital Bikeshare system, but the revenue the city receives from the fee collection completely covers the operating payments. In contrast, the city’s Metro and bus fares only recover half of those systems’ operating costs, ITDP says. View article >

Bike share boom: 7 cities doing it right

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CNN Travel (USA) 12/6/13: Today, more than 600 cities deploy more than 700,000 bicycles to be shared by locals, according to the New York City-based Institute for Transportation and Development (ITDP). Of these, the largest systems are in China, in cities such as Hangzhou and Shanghai. View article >

The World’s Top 7 Bike-Share Systems

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Atlantic Cities (USA) 12/5/13: If you want to have a great bike-share program in your city, a few factors are key, according to a report just outfrom the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy. View article >

Poll Illustrates Transit’s Potential to Support Economic Development

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Digital Journal, 11/13/13: A new America THINKS survey from HNTB Corporation shows more than 7 in 10 (71 percent) Americans already see public transportation as more reliable than unreliable. The research also finds most Americans see public transit as a money saver and, for many, a requirement when relocating. View article >

Making City Roads Pedestrian-Friendly

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New Indian Express, 10/18/13: The Chennai Corporation’s initiative to widen footpaths from 1.5 metres to 3 metres by reclaiming space from road in order to make it pedestrian friendly and to regulate traffic, has won accolades from civil society. The Centre for Science and Environment in New Delhi hailed this initiative by the Chennai Corporation officials, during an international workshop here. View article >

To Attract Urban Investment, Build a Bus Line

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Wired Magazine, 10/1/13: Streetcars may be sexy and light rail may be alluring, but it turns out that building a bus line is how a city can get the most bang for its buck when it comes to attracting development. A new study from the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (ITDP), examined the growth of transit-oriented development in 21 cities with various forms of surface public transportation. Compared to streetcars and light rail, the authors found that the bus won out big time in terms of generating high-value development at a low upfront cost. View article >

The Surprising Key to Making Transit-oriented Development Work

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The Atlantic Cities, 9/24/13: Today, the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy released a report showing that bus-rapid transit can play a huge role in stimulating economic development — often leveraging more investment than rail projects do. Previous research already suggested as much, but the impact documented in the ITDP report is still eye-catching. Every dollar spent building Cleveland’s HealthLine BRT system, for instance, generated $114 in transit-oriented development. View article >

Age Limits for Cars Encouraged in Jakarta

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Jakarta Globe, 9/26/13: A transportation analyst has urged the Jakarta authorities to impose a limit on the age of vehicles allowed on the streets, in a bid to both reduce exhaust emissions and cut back on car use. Yoga Adiwinarto, the director of the Indonesia office of the Institute for Transportation and Development Policy, said on Wednesday that the idea had long been discussed by city officials but never implemented. View article >

Get on the Bus

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Slate, 8/23/13: When it comes to moving large numbers of people efficiently through urban areas, it’s hard to beat good old-fashioned heavy rail subways and metro lines. But these projects come at a steep price, especially in the United States, and don’t make sense in many areas. Yet, politicians looking for cheaper options too often fall for the superficial idea that anything that runs on train tracks must be a good idea. The smarter strategy in many cases is to look instead at the numerically dominant form of mass transit—the humble bus—and ask what can be done to make it less humble. View article >

BRT: Cities Get on Board with Better, Reliable Transportation

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Planetizen, 7/2/13: With Millennials leading America’s historic decline in driving, cities are exploring ways to attract young professionals through reliable mass transit. Benjamin de la Pena and Nicholas Turner argue that Bus Rapid Transit is the optimal solution. View article >

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