Language: English

Infographic: (click to enlarge)

Many of the world’s most important cities are expanding rapidly without adequate transportation planning. People Near Rapid Transit (PNT) measures the number of residents in a city who live within a short walking distance (1 km) of high-quality rapid transit. This is a good way to estimate accessibility and rapid transit coverage in large cities….

The BRT Standard is the centerpiece of a global effort by leaders in bus transportation design to establish a common definition of bus rapid transit (BRT) and ensure that BRT systems more uniformly deliver world-class passenger experiences, significant economic benefits, and positive environmental impacts. BRT plays an important role in the global effort to reduce transport…

Letter from the CEO: Putting Pedestrians First Healthy, Equitable, Environmental Cities Transforming Our World with New Sustainable Development Goals In Yichang, China, A New BRT Connects the City A Sustainable Smart Future: New Transport Investments Tool Shows Indian Cities the Way Forward Changing Direction: Walking and Cycling in African Cities How to Enjoy the City…

This infographic accompanies Part 2 of a report on how national governments can support urban transit growth. Part 2, Growing Rapid Transit Infrastructure: Funding, Financing, and Capacity, analyzes how the funding practices, financing practices, and institutional capacity impact a country’s ability to deliver rapid transit effectively. Read the full report for details. Download this infographic

The Potential for Dramatically Increasing Bicycle and E-bike Use in Cities Around the World, with Estimated Energy, CO2, and Cost Impacts Cycling plays a major role in personal mobility around the world, but it could play a much bigger role. Given the convenience, health benefits, and affordability of bicycles, they could provide a far greater proportion of urban passenger…

Parking is a mystery. Many public agencies push for more parking in buildings, but, rather than alleviating the parking problem, it leads to massive traffic jams, severe air pollution, and more road deaths. Under the illusion that density creates congestion, public agencies also control building density. However, it is parking, not density, that creates traffic…

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