Author: Margaret Van Cleve

Walking is the world’s most common mode of transportation. Everyone, regardless of how they travel, is also a pedestrian, as most trips begin and end with walking. Walkability, a measure of how friendly a street, neighborhood, or city is to walking – is one of the most reliable indicators of urban equity, resilience, health, air…

In a year of turmoil, changes, and unrest, the world’s cities have not stopped making necessary improvements and working towards more sustainable solutions for their residents. From throughout the world, the Sustainable Transport Award (STA) Committee received an unprecedented 30 applications from cities making walking, cycling, and safety a priority. Applications for the STA have…

September marks six months since New York City imposed it’s PAUSE restrictions which encouraged people to stay indoors as much as possible and forced many offices, stores, and restaurants to close. Six months later, New York City, like the rest of the world, is transformed. Still the question remains: can the pandemic be used as…

Everett, Massachusetts, is a city directly bordering Boston. It has an ethnically diverse population of 40,000 people––one-third of whom were born outside of the United States. The population has a large age range––with almost equal amounts of people of each age, meaning seniors and families predominate. The per capita income for the city is just…

Access as a Tool for Equity Transit can be measured in kilometers, number of stops, ridership, speed. While these metrics are important and can be illuminating, they cannot quite fully capture the utility of a transit mode. That is where access comes in: an opportunity to measure the connection, distance from transit, but more importantly,…

How did you first become interested in the sustainable urban transport field? Before joining politics, I was the leader and founder of a civic organization that gained immense popularity – especially among Albanian youth – for its novel and peaceful protest methods. Our goal was to raise awareness of important issues that hindered the quality…

In Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia, over half of daily trips are taken on foot. This rapidly growing city, home to over three million people, and expected exceed five million within the next decade, has until recently followed a familiar transport growth trajectory: building more space for cars to the detriment of all other…

There are a range of beliefs all around the world of what makes a city bike-friendly. Some point to the most visible factors, such as weather and city terrain; others say it’s about a city’s commitment to creating infrastructure and regulating cars; and still others believe that cultural support of cycling is the key. Earlier…

In a dialogue published in our annual newsletter, two ITDP Directors, Michael Kodransky and Bernardo Baranda, discuss their respective cities in terms of mobility growth, local policy, and how the coronavirus has affected movement of people. Michael Kodransky is the Director of ITDP US, the newest and rapidly expanding ITDP office, with offices in Boston…

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